11 Jan 2008

I realize I haven’t described what Midlana looks like. While the details are still squishy, it’s basically a Lotus Super Seven with the passenger compartment pushed forward enough to allow a transverse drivetrain behind the driver. It’s not original (what is?) as there’s one manufacturer in England (Sylva) that produces one now, the Riot. Will Midlana be a knockoff of that, no, though all these cars are a knockoff of something. No, it’ll be its own thing, but will use commonly available composite so the builder has little or no messy, stinky composite work to do. It’s going to be “buildable”, easy to maintain, and inexpensive.

Thanks for all the comments regarding seat placement, sorry I couldn’t respond to everyone separately. I think I’m going to stick to the traditional side-by-side placement. It’s a combination of reasons: routing the seatbelts, not getting undue attention from safety inspectors, motor vehicle registration people, and later, cops, and, being able to hear, say, a driving instructor. From a selfish point of view, it’ll be much easier to get it through registration in California if it looks like a “normal” car. Then there’s the “too different” aspect; I’d like this car to be something people <i>want</i> to build, and the center seating might be a bit much. I know I’ll never make everyone happy, but alienating a huge group right off the bat’s probably not a good idea!

Engine choice: The builder will have a decent-sized bay to install whatever they want (with limits). Everyone has access to different engines due to differing budgets and regional availability. Then there’s form factor. There are many transverse FWD drivetrains out there, all with similar layout; that’s the type that Midlana will accept. Of course there are other engines like the Subaru flat-four: low, light, with a “real” transaxle. The problem is that the transmission tail shaft sticks out quite far past the axle centerline. That’s of no consequence if the car’s designed for it, but it’s not. A transverse layout is shorter, front to back, which packages much nicer, and there’s the rub. There are far more transverse drivetrains out there than Subaru drivetrains, so I didn’t want to force builders to use only one engine brand. (Technically the engine bay could be made large enough to fit everything on earth, that it gets out of hand. This is the consequence of following a cookbook; you’re stuck with the designer’s vision).