14 April 2018

Took Midlana and the granddaughter to the new Cars and Coffee location, currently  at the Outlet San Clemente mall (one can only wonder how long it’ll be before they get thrown out from there as well, which seems to be the fate of the event, for noise, exhibition of speed, etc). This was the first time she’d been to any car show and, it went about as expected, not much interest, but the point was to expose her to it at least once so she knows they exist and what it’s about. I told her that I’d be happy to take her again but she has to ask – I won’t pester her to go.

No good deed goes unpunished and the traffic for the 50-mile trip home was brutal. The clutch was used about a million times because even at idle in first, Midlana wanted to move along faster than traffic. Being around 28 C didn’t help but it was a good test of the updated cooling system; coolant got up to around 90C but no higher. On the way up it was the exact opposite temperature-wise, dipping as low as 6C, brrrr. With such low temperatures, engine coolant only got up to about 80C.

Speaking of that, I’ve been watching how alternator voltage varies with temperature. In cold weather, charging voltage is 14.1V, perfect, and turning on the radiator fan caused it to drop to about 13.5V, still pretty good. On the way home in the heat though, charging voltage slowly dropped off to around 13.6V and dropped to 12.9V with the fan on. I was going to check to see whether the Chevy pickup alternator I’m using has an “S” input (Remote Sense). As I type this though, I just realized it doesn’t matter if it does or not. If there was a voltage drop problem at higher air temperature, it would still be there in cooler weather, but the problem is only during warm weather, ruling that out. It’s not like the alternator is being overheated either; right now there’s neither an engine cover nor belly pan. Also, since this is a cross-flow engine with the alternator on the intake side, it’s not near anything hot. I suspect the built-in alternator regulator just isn’t very good over temperature.

I could try running a cold air hose from the side vent to the alternator, but related to the above, since it’s already fairly well ventilated, there’s a good chance that the “cool air” being fed to it through a hose from the outside isn’t much lower than the air already swirling around the engine compartment. Of course, zooming way out on the problem, I’m not sure how much it matters. That is, it’s been this way for years and hasn’t been an issue, though I do keep a battery tender on it when in the garage. Then, during the endless traffic jam yesterday, I managed to stall it once and forgot the radiator fan was still on; when cranking, the battery clearly wasn’t happy at all about having to run both (sounding like a run-down battery). So there’s several approaches: do nothing, get the aftermarket alternator and hope it’s less temperature sensitive, or set up a cooling air duct for the existing unit and hope the outside air is a lot cooler than engine compartment air.