19 Feb 2019

Okay, a lot has happened in the last couple weeks, though there’s not a lot to materially show for it. Shown in the picture below is the sum of the work. Seen is a spindle light and speed sensor (made from a 100mm LED ring light intended for cars). Also seen is the black box below the DRO, which contains the controls for speed, direction, and jog. Both AC and DC braking are enabled, so when the mill is switched off, the spindle stops in about 1.5 seconds. That and other features were found after hours spent combing through the 440-page Hitachi variable frequency drive manual. It was worth it, as everything now runs the way I want. Oh, and of course, the mill had to have a Kurt vice. Anyway, with all this out of the way, it means…

The mill can now be used to actually do stuff. First on the list is something that’s been bugging me lately, the alternator mounting bracket in Midlana. It flexes, yet is made from 0.25″ steel. When belt tension is increased, the alternator nose moves in the direction of the tension, throwing off belt alignment. The concern is accelerated belt wear or having it break somewhere remote, especially since it’s a pain to replace. The existing bracket will either be modified or a new one made with thicker material.

Also near the bracket happens to be the idle control valve. The last few times the car was driven, after it’s fully warmed up, idle has a bad habit of hanging up around 1600 RPM for maybe 15 seconds. I don’t think it’s software, and Honda idle control valves are known to stick, so it’s got to be cleaned. It’s Like the alternator bracket, it’s hard enough to get at that I might try the easy way first and shoot some carburetor cleaner into the idle port rather than removing the intake manifold first. We’ll see.