25 Jan 2008

Finally tested the coil-over shocks with a proper press and load cell. As suspected, there’s a sizable gas preload pressure before the shock starts to compress. It was a lot of fun, actually, as I rarely have the proper tools to do this. I’m always having to guess or approximate what I’m doing due to not having the right tools, always making me feel bad about doing a half-assed design job. However, when I’ve got the proper tools it’s a really good feeling knowing that the data I’m collecting isn’t “roughly” this, or “about” that – it’s exact. With this data I can confidently design the push-rod suspension, and know it’ll work first time. That’s a great feeling to have even before it’s built.

After 25 years of resisting, I’ve finally given into probably having two sets of wheels and tires, one for the street and one for the track. Given that, I’ve backed off on buying the lightest street wheels possible, since they’ll have to deal with potholes (and bonehead tire installation shops…) Street wheels are far from light but then again they cost less than 1/3 that of a really light racing wheel. So it was a bit surprising to come to terms with purposely buying something that isn’t the best. Yup, today, street wheels were ordered. Theoretically they aren’t needed but they’re invaluable for suspension mock ups and checking clearances. Having CAD is pointless when detailed dimensions aren’t available, which is a lot of the time. Wheels are especially bad in this respect, and it’s a rare manufacturer that supplies accurate cross-sectional drawings. The best anyone gets is bolt pattern and back-spacing.

The ultralight track wheels that cost crazy money will come later after the car’s built and ready for the track.