27 Sept 2020

Our parent’s house sold, so the weekends have opened back up somewhat. I say “somewhat” because there are always honey-dos, but that still leaves some me-time, so Midlana was taken out for the first time in about six months(!) Everything was fine, until the engine was found to rev limit right at 4,000 rpm, so it was very likely happening by design… (always be suspicious of round numbers). Glancing at the sensor values showed that lambda (air-fuel ratio) was reading “1.oo” (another suspicious round number), which is fine, except that it wasn’t changing. I expected to find that I’d forgotten to reinstall the sensor. I panicked for a second when the sensor was found installed, but then discovered that I’d committed a cardinal sin: installing the sensor but failed to latch the connector. No harm done, but it’s a reminder to not make that a habit!

In other news, Tesla just came out with theirĀ  Plaid Model S (no kidding). What’s notable about this $140,000 sedan that can carry 4-5 adults is that it has around 1,100 hp. But what’s probably a historic milestone is that you can expect to be barred from many drag strips because it doesn’t have a cage or parachute, items required for 8-second cars, which is what Tesla claims it can achieve.

Drivetrain technology aside, I’m not sure that people spending $140K want something that looks the same as the 10-yr old $60K version. And even more importantly, as impressive as its 1:30 Laguna Seca lap time is, it weighs 4,500 lbs! That’s seriously heavy for a “sports car” of any sort, and all that weight/energy has to be dealt with via the brakes and tires. The brake solution is straightforward: go huge. For the tires though, they’re going to be a very high wear item if anyone takes it to a track day event. That said, tire expense seems to be ignored these days, and I guess if you can afford a $140,000 car, tire cost isn’t a thing. In any case, it seems like we’re very near the point where electric sports cars take over as far as performance goes; all it takes now are lighter batteries to seal the deal. Notice that battery range wasn’t mentioned. The above car has a 500 mile range, so limited range is no longer a reason not to buy one (cost aside of course).