30 January 2019

This week had previously been planned as vacation, but coincidently, a minor operation got scheduled late last week. It’s just as well, because recovery has been rather unpleasant. Let’s just say that sitting requires much care, and does involve a donut cushion. I have no idea if it’ll end up back to normal, or if this is the new normal.

Anyway, never being one to sit around, (and the wife out of town), an epic garage cleanup happened in preparation for the arrival of the mill. First was finishing up the mill stand.

Next was an epic garage cleanup, and at the end of several days of non-stop purging, the side yard is a mess. With rain forecast for the rest of the week, not sure how much will get hauled off. From an anthropological standpoint, it was both interesting and disappointing to see what was dug up, things forgotten and buried for 10-20 years—there were even parts from Kimini. Some of the tubing and sheet scraps are so corroded that it, too, will likely end up at the scrap yard. I also have a (bad?) habit of keeping any tubing cutoffs longer than about 2-inches, so there were several very heavy containers of scraps of questionable worth. A line had to be drawn so much of it is going as well.

With the mill taking the place of the drill press, it was moved out from between the “welding table” (in quotes because I haven’t seen but a tiny corner of it in years; it’s a separate cleanup project) and the lathe. That left 15″ of valuable floor space where the lathe could be slide over and the grinding center rotated 90 degrees to free up walking space. The trick of course was actually moving the lathe. I have no idea what it weighs but no luck trying to slide it. I even backed up the truck to the garage and tied a strap to the lathe, with the thinking that I could pull it the necessary distance, but Little Voice in the Head kept saying “bad idea”, so I gave up (the concern being that it would have applied a sideways tipping force, which could have caused it to fall onto Midlana.

I then wondered if a crowbar could lift one end, and a metal rod placed under it to serve as a roller, and then push it. Yes indeed that worked great.

There was swarf, dirt, dust, and who knows what else everywhere, areas which hadn’t been cleaned in decades. (I have a wall-mounted garage vacuum with a HEPA filter; I’m glad it does because I know some of that dust picked up was from the TIG electrodes ground on the belt sander. Some of them contain 2% Thorium, which is radioactive… yeah.) Anyway, two trash bags were filled with just that, and it felt really good to get the entire mess finally cleaned up. I can work in messy conditions because I stay focused on the work-at-hand, but the mess is like a nagging… well never mind. It gets on my nerves after a while and at some point, it has to be dealt with.

Next, the large storage shelving unit was modified per the plan, shortening it 24″ to free up room for the mill (a non-negotiable step, proactively forcing the point that  enough stuff will be thrown to make up for it. So far so good.

In parallel with this, basic tooling for the mill was ordered: a Kurt (of course) vise, cutter bits, collets, and so on. That’s mostly to avoid the wife getting bombarded with many individual boxes arriving at the front door, which only generates troubling questions that I hate to burden her with.

After that, attention turned to the Hitachi WJ200 phase controller (for varying mill motor speed) and how to control it. An order to Digikey provided all the bits, and it was with some irony that I thought “a mill would be really handy to cut out and and drill all this.” This box contains a tachometer and even a cute little calculator to determine cutter speed. In addition there are direction controls, speed, jog, and emergency stop. Of course, it’s not complete without a self-peeling label; that’ll get dealt with at the same time the other controls are labeled.

Lastly, picked up some heavy wire and a fuse box and cut-off switch in anticipation of wiring the beast. We’ll see if the mill comes with a 115VAC outlet (it runs on 230VAC). It’ll be needed for the tach, DRO, and future lighting. Anyway, I don’t get too excited very often, but I feed like Ralphy in the movie Christmas Story when he realizes he’s getting the Red Rider BB gun. Expect more pictures soon since it’s scheduled to be here in about 30 minutes :).