26 March 2018

Here you go – Rear engine mount test video

Looks like the lower most layer or two need stiffening up, which is now easy enough to do.

I enabled the HDR-AS300’s GPS overlay and while it’s interesting, it may prove to be something of a novelty since GPS speed lags so far behind (how does my dash keep up with the same data?). The route information is interesting, but again, not sure how useful it’ll prove to be.

Forgot to mention yesterday that the transmission shifts so easily, I twice shifted into the wrong gear. Doing so while just cruising (like I was) isn’t a big deal, but having that happen on-track is a different story. Going to have to get better accustomed to the new gears, syncros, and shifting effort.

Lastly, my dog-box transmission is being boxed up and shipped home. Once it’s here it’ll officially be for sale.

25 March 2018

Spent the weekend building the new rear engine mount, which took way longer than expected. Part of this is my own doing though, because with Kimini, I planned everything out to an extreme and as a result, fabrication went smoothly and very little had to be redone. With parts of Midlana though, I’ve been testing how much I can “wing it” and still have it turn out right – this one just made it.

The plan was to have the engine mount rubber “field-tunable”. The OEM mount works fine in an OEM application – but not so much with 400+ ft-lbs of torque. Also, applying torque to the side of a bolt in a rubber-filled tube just doesn’t work well when a lot of force is applied because it’s so concentrated.  That’s why a 2″ x 4″ steel “foot” is used to spread out the load and rests between layers of polyurethane sheet. Being a rear engine mount on a clockwise-spinning engine means that the layers below handle acceleration torque and the layers above handle deceleration. This allows using different durometer rubber for each layer. So the prototype was built but the unknown was how much it would deflect under power and deceleration – and how much vibration would be transferred to the chassis.

“If only I was able to watch it.” Presto, that’s what the new Sony camcorder is for, so it was attached to a rear tube and aimed at the engine mount. About now you’re probably looking for the link – well, there isn’t one yet. It’s late, the camera’s new, and I have to figure out its editor. Hopefully it’ll be  good enough else I’ll have to find a “real” video editor. I watched the raw video and it’s pretty cool what you can see and hear – I’ll post it up sometime this week.

In other news – the clutch! With the new transmission having synchros instead of dog engagement,  I again used Competition Clutch’s instructions  to set the clutch stop for the twin-disc clutch. With the dog-box, I couldn’t set it as instructed because it would instantly drop into gear even without the clutch. The instructions say to gently push the gear lever like you’re going into a gear, while at the same time slowly depressing the clutch. At some point it’ll drop in, then push the pedal another 1/4″ and set the clutch stop there. Well, I did, and holy smokes does it change the character of the car. Clutch throw is now much shorter and with the close gear ratios, it makes shifting much faster. I’m really happy how that turned out.