1 June 2019

First, the excuses:

We got so much rain this year (spread over months) that there’s tons of weeds to pull, gophers and snails to kill, plants to trim, and getting the koi pond system ready for summer. Knock down any of the first four and they come right back due to the continued moisture. Then there’s building a garden shed to help with “yard organization”, in quotes because I admit to some nefarious scheming: getting more stuff out of the garage. Of course, what goes in there has to be balanced against the expected high heat in summer, and the possibility that it’s broken into. The garden shed is 3/4 done, but stalled due to getting soaked by a constant drizzle, hence me typing this up, but it frees up time to figure out the throttle spring.

Ah yes, the sticking throttle cable. Reading about such cables on bicycle sites, it seems that good cables shouldn’t be lubricated because it tends to accelerate wear due to attracting dirt. The alternative, and a good idea in general, is a second throttle return spring. The trick is making it work with the existing helical spring, either by adding a second one if there’s room, or adding a more traditional spring off an existing or new hard point.

I know I have a bad habit of talking about car stuff and then not doing it (like, oh, the engine cover, air filter housing, and the open area behind the muffler, and throttle spring, but I digress.) In that tradition, I’ve been thinking for a while now about doing a YouTube video series on Midlana. The episodes would cover various aspects of the design and serve as an overview/introduction for people thinking of building one. It has moved beyond just the thinking stage, having acquired a good lens for the camera, a mic, and decent lighting.

What’s spurred this on in-part are the videos made by This Old Tony. They’re very well done, well choreographed, well lit, with a good dose of humor, and they’re very informative; that’s the high bar I aspire to. What’s also helps is that you almost never see his face… this appeals to me!

Least you think I’m finally getting back to Midlana, another project is rebuilding my lathe. I bought a used Grizzly DF-1237G in the late 1990’s (it was apparently manufactured in the early 1990’s). From day one it’s leaked oil like a sieve, and while annoying, it still managed to help build Kimini and Midlana. While the draw is strong to buy a new lathe, I can’t in good conscience justify the expense when this one works fine, other than the leaks. I found a machinist’s forum where a few others have this same model (and all complaining about oil leaks). Grizzly still has some spare parts but  were out of oil seals (no doubt due to the systemic leaks). Like bearings, oil seals are a universal part, so now on-hand are new oil seals, as many bearings as I could get, stickers, and new belts. Oh, and I want to paint it; some people like the Grizzly green, but I prefer “machine gray.” I’m probably not going to strip it down completely (want to stay clear of the threading gearbox) so hopefully painting it doesn’t become a fiasco.

14 April 2019

Drove Midlana for the first time in a long while – no issues with the alternator bracket. The drive reminded me about something that had been going on for awhile, and still is; when letting off the gas, engine speed hangs at about 1500-1600 rpm for 2-5 seconds before dropping to idle. I earlier thought that the idle control valve was suspect, but also mentioned that it has very low hours on it since being cleaned. Turns out that the throttle cable appears to be sticking a bit. Pushing the throttle to above idle speed, then lightly releasing it showed that the throttle doesn’t always close fully. I’d add a second throttle return spring, except this throttle body, with its helical return spring, doesn’t lend itself easily to that mod. Since replacing the throttle cable is a real bear (everything has to come out, seat belts, seats, middle channel cover), I rather first try a second spring.

12 April 2019

As the new alternator bracket was being machined, it dawned on me that it’s been over 40 years since I last used a mill. To make it more entertaining was that as machining progressed, the part had fewer and fewer parallel faces on it to clamp on to. Thankfully, there were only a couple critical dimensions  so I managed to not wreck it. The odd contours are dictated by what the bracket has to avoid on both the block and alternator. As you can see by the surface finish, a roughing cutter was used and I didn’t see any point in cleaning it up. The most egregious bits are the radiuses around the alternator mounting holes, which were done free hand – no CNC here, yet.

With that off the list, the next item is a new engine cover. As mentioned previously, it’s not just for looks. Wind comes up over the windscreen and pushes air immediately above the passenger compartment aft. That air has to be replaced, which comes from the area over the engine bay, and therein lies the potential problem. Say half way up a hill climb course, a fuel leak develops and lights off. Airflow will push the flames forward into the passenger compartment, which is too ugly to think about, so the engine bay needs to be covered. The new one may or may not use parts of the old, particularly the louver subassembly. The one nagging part is paint, which wouldn’t be an issue had non-metallic paint been used. I haven’t decided what to do; I’m concerned that if I attempt it, it won’t match at all. I’m almost tempted to go the other way, painting it flat black, but it obviously won’t match doing that either!