25 April 2021

Took Midlana out for a few hours; it was nice to get out of the house and into the fresh air. Apparently everyone else felt the same way, because roads were really crowded, us all just slowly bumping along from one red light to the next.

In other news, as I gradually approach retirement age, in addition to the pond and garden, I’ve been gathering tools to keep myself busy in the garage, and one of those is CAD software. Because I plan to use it for many years, subscription software is a big No, yet unfortunately, that’s where the industry is headed. While it may be fine for a business, it’s a no-go for someone with a hobby that doesn’t make money. Worse, spending $500+ a year for  a decade or two is just nuts. I asked around on machinist forums to see what they use, and it was a bit funny/annoying that they kept suggesting “great” CAD packages that are, you guessed it, subscription-based. I was even offered a  free copy of SolidWorks, as in, an older version that doesn’t check the license. I decided not to for several reasons, one being that it’s like Robin Hood offering you a free flat-screen TV; it’s not their’s to give. Older versions of SolidWorks are indeed offered online—on what look like really sketchy websites. The copy I was offered might be fine, maybe, but I just can’t in good conscience go that way. After more research, I chose Alibre. Yes, there’s FreeCAD, but I’ve read enough about it that I don’t want to mess with it. There’s also the free version of Fusion 360, but the manufacturer recently neutered it a bit, souring me on what they might do to it in the future, and their pay-for product is, ta-da, subscription-based.

So, what’s the CAD for? Well, if there’s another car project, it needs CAD, and I refuse to use Google Sketchup again, so it means coming up to speed on another package. So much is going CNC: lathes, mills, routers, laser cutters, plasma cutters, and off course, 3D printers. Since CAD takes time to learn, it makes sense to start with that first, so Alibre is already installed and I’m starting in on self-imposed training. Some of you may remember me complaining about how expensive it is to get anything laser cut. If I build a CNC laser cutter, what I would have paid someone would pay for a big share of making my own.

The thing is, all the above takes space, a constant struggle for anyone working in a standard-size garage!

2 April 2021

Yes, I know, it’s been a long time…

Midlana #2, built by Chris of Worcestershire UK, has passed all required testing, license plates are affixed, and he plans a first drive this weekend! Expect updates on his driving experiences in the Midlana Builder’s Forum.

If you’re considering building your own Midlana and live in the UK, you might want to contact Chris regarding his experiences, and maybe if you ask real nice, get a ride 🙂

12 January 2021

Just been working from home. With the pandemic going on, it’s hard to justify even going out for a fun drive. While the stay-at-home rules aren’t really being enforced regarding driving, and while being in an open top car is going to be pretty safe, it just seems better to avoid any potential situations. The virus is so unpredictable; one person will get it and have zero symptoms, while another will get it and be dead in a couple weeks.

Anyway, for work reasons I had to stop by a military base, and it was pretty funny seeing a Lotus Evora in the “Recruiting Staff” parking slot. I guess that’s one way to get people to sign up, showing the glamour that comes with the job!

In other news, a Midlana builder recommended F1 car designer, Adrian Newey’s autobiography, How to Build a Car. Being new to audio books I gave it a listen and it was very interesting, hearing all about both the design process and the issues involved in getting a car on-track. Just as interesting was hearing that many times, Ferrari would copy some new feature that they saw on other cars, couldn’t get it to work, so would then protest the teams using it. Nice…